Halloween Décor Ideas

Halloween is a fun holiday for a lot of reasons, one being that it’s a great reason to decorate! And yes, sometimes that decoration is crazy spider webs and smoking punch, but Lynnie Pinnie has a lot of great Halloween themed designs to help you make your space suitably Halloween themed. Here are some ideas for Halloween decoration featuring Lynnie Pinnie Halloween designs.

This adorable pumpkin trio would be great for a Halloween or Fall themed table runner. It could run along the edges or be sewn at intervals across the entire surface of the runner.

There’s a certain movie coming out September 30 that a lot of people are eagerly anticipating. If you’re thinking of having a watch party and want to create some suitable decorations, Lynnie Pinnie can help. We have a variety of witch sisters designs, but this one is a particular favorite. Imagine how cute it would be as a wall hanging, or embroidered on cloth napkins.

This next design gets my vote for cutest way to keep your trick or treaters safe while they’re out getting their sugar haul. This design would be cute if it were embroidered in glow in the dark or reflective thread on trick or treat bags. Safety is always important while the little ones are out trick or treating, and having bags which make them more visible would definitely help with that.

The next design could be a fun way to gain admittance to a haunted house or corn maze. Or maybe tokens to win toward prizes at a Halloween party. Badges of bravery for surviving the terrors of a haunted house? The options are endless with these fun Halloween themed badges.

We all know that Halloween is about two things, dressing up and candy. Why not stop beating around the bush and give your little ghosts and goblins a trick or treat bag that states their true allegiance? This bag takes all the questions out of the equation.

If you have a child that’s a bit shy, or one who’s non-verbal, saying Trick or Treat may not be something they’re able to do. In those cases, this design does the talking for them. Embroider it on a trick or treat bag, and they can simply show it. This could also be a great design to go on party favors for bags of candy at a Halloween party.

And finally, we have this adorable treat pocket witch, who is holding her share of the tasty Halloween treats. A perfect Halloween party favor, this could also be a great way to distribute treats to your child’s classmates. Another option for this would be to add store or company names, and sell them to companies participating in civic trick or treat activities.

How to stitch the Lynnie Pinnie Faux Chenille Varsity Font

Supplies needed:

  • Purchase the font HERE
  • HTV: Heat transfer vinyl (Cricut brand iron on was used in this sample – available in many big box and craft stores). PEEL OFF PLASTIC CARRIER SHEET BEFORE STITCHING. Glitter and flocked vinyl are the easiest to tear away. We do not recommend smooth.
  • Tape
  • Your choice of embroidery thread, garment or blank, and appropriate stabilizer for your garment or blank. This is a dense font that you will need to stabilize well.
  • Optional – vinyl weeding tool
  • Optional – embroidery software. I used Embrilliance Essentials to set up my lettering, color sort my design, and print a template.
Heat Transfer vinyl. You will need to peel away the plastic carrier sheet before stitching.
My printed template and heat transfer vinyl with carrier sheet peeled back.

Let’s get stitching!

I hooped and stabilized my garment, and then stitched step 1, my placement stitch, in a color that closely matches the HTV.

Next, I laid the HTV over the placement stitch, making sure to cover all of the placement stitches. I used a bit of tape to hold it in place because the embroidery machine needle tends to lift and move the HTV. The HTV plastic carrier sheet has been removed.

The next step will be your tack down stitch. I used the same thread color again.

After the vinyl was tacked down, I used my choice of thread colors for the letters and outlines.

The final stitch will be an outline around the letters. Again, I used a thread color that matches the HTV.

Now for the fun part!

Carefully peel away the excess HTV. You can use a vinyl weeding tool to help with small areas. If you stitch this font in a smaller size, like I did, you can leave the small areas that are inside the holes, for example, inside the letter “E”, or you can weed them out. It’s up to you!

Examples of small areas are circled in pink. Leave them or remove them – your choice!
Excess vinyl pulls away, no scissors or trimming required!

Final step – don’t skip this!

Once you have removed all of the excess vinyl, follow the instructions on the vinyl package to fuse the HTV to your garment or blank with a heat press or iron. USE A TEFLON SHEET OR PRESSING CLOTH TO PROTECT THE EMBROIDERY!

All done!

This font is such a great way to achieve a look that would be otherwise impossible (or at least VERY difficult) in a smaller size. Yes, it is a dense, higher stitch count design but personally, I would rather let the machine stitch this out than try to trim a piece of fabric this small with scissors. NO THANKS!

The stitches lie flat – the faux chenille look is achieved with a unique stitch pattern.

Feel free to Contact Us with any questions.

Happy Stitching!

5 Reasons to Buy from LynniePinnie

When you ask people about LynniePinnie designs, the words you hear used to describe those designs are words like “adorable” or “whimsical” or “magical”. While it’s true that the designs are adorable, and whimsical, and magical, there also many more reasons why purchasing a LynniePinnie design is a good idea.

Reason #1: LynniePinnie Knows Embroidery – Lyndsie Salcido, the designer behind LynniePinnie began as an embroiderer. She knows how to run a machine. She understands the despair of your thread or bobbin running out before the design is finished stitching. Lyndsie has experienced the pain of poorly digitized and conceived designs that stitch out slowly or are sloppy in execution. Because she’s run an embroidery business, she understands that designs need to work, so that the machine can run and profit, or a cute gift for a friend or family member can be made.

Reason #2: LynniePinnie Knows Materials – One of the not so well kept secrets of embroidery is that thread and stabilizer and fabric and design all come together in a marriage that will hopefully create an attractive finished piece. Part of the work of being a good digitizer is understanding how all the separate parts come together and interact. The weight of the fabric matters. The weight of the thread matters. The type of stabilizer used can have an impact. Digitizers who understand more than just how the stitches will be stitched into the substrate are digitizers who will create designs that will run more smoothly and much faster.

Reason #3: LynniePinnie Knows It Matters – When you buy a design, whether it’s something you plan to use on a garment you’ve sold to a client, or if you’re making a new shirt for your daughter or son, you want that design to sew out cleanly and smoothly without errors or issues. Thread breaks, excess stitches, sloppy digitizing that results in a sloppy finished product, all those things waste your time, your supplies and your money. Creating designs that are well digitized takes effort and time, but the end result is a design that sews out how you want it to, when you want it to, and that’s what’s important. Yes, it takes more effort on LynniePinnie’s end, but it puts a better finished product in the hands of our customers, and that’s what counts.

Reason #4: LynniePinnie Knows Creativity – Resting on your laurels is for those who aren’t always trying to be better today than they were yesterday. Lyndsie is continually trying new processes and developing new designs and projects to take machine embroidery to the next level. The goal is always to stay current and to improve on what has come before. LynniePinnie also strives to find new ways to enhance the process of machine embroidery. Same old/same old will never do here. We want to stay on the cutting edge of decoration techniques and embroidery trends, and we make an effort to do so.

Reason #5: LynnniePinnie Loves Digitizing (And Our Customers) – The art and craft of digitizing is not for everyone. It requires a pretty specific skill set. For our designer, Lyndsie, creating a new design is both a challenge and a labor of love, and the designs reflect that love. There’s no sloppiness, no cutting corners, no work that we can’t be proud to offer to you, our customers. Yes, the designs may sometimes cost a little more, and yes, design releases may take a bit more time, but the end result is well worth the effort and the money. While we don’t, as some creatives do, put a “Made with Love” label on each design we sell, the love is still there, in the effort put in to creating the design, and in the care that is taken to make sure the design works at the highest level to meet our customers’ needs.

Copyright and Digitized Designs

If you’ve been in the world of machine embroidery for any length of time, you’ve probably heard at least one story about a company who was using and selling items with designs which they didn’t have the rights to use, and who was caught. Maybe it’s the story of the day care that had a mural painted using Disney characters and was sued. Maybe it’s the screen print shop using an NFL team’s logo who had their merchandise seized. Copyright is a huge issue, and violating a copyright can have big, and expensive consequences. Even if you think your business is small, and using a design you don’t have the right to use won’t be noticed, or even if you believe one of the myths about copyright that are floating around the industry, the hard fact is that using a design to which you don’t have the rights can mean fines, jail time and even the loss of your business. To make sure you stay on the right side of the copyright issue, you need to know the facts.

The first fact to know is that sharing designs is illegal. Even if you legally bought the design and the rights to use it, posting it in a group for others to download, or sharing it with friends so they can use it is breaking copyright and against the law. So all those Facebook groups or design sharing sites you might find online are essentially full of criminals. The bottom line is this: if you didn’t pay for the design and purchase the rights to use it, then you have no right to use it, and you’re breaking the law if you do. You’re also stealing income from the person who made the design. So just don’t do it.

Let’s talk for a moment about what is meant when we talk about “rights”. When you legally purchase a design from a designer, they grant you certain rights in regard to how the design can be used, whether it can be used on items which you sell and other provisions regarding the design. LynniePinnie’s terms of use are pretty standard detailing what you may and may not do with the designs you purchase, and even with the associated images. Staying within these guidelines means you’re using the designs as intended. Straying outside them means you’re breaking the law.

You should also be aware that a lot of the myths about copyright that are heard often around the industry are not true. There is no percentage rule that allows you to change a copyrighted design by that percentage to avoid violating copyright. There is also no avoiding copyright issues if you are creating something for your own use and not for sale. Most design licenses will specify how the design can be used, some may authorize use on items which will be sold, other designs may specify for personal use only and not for sale items. Basically, the safest thing to do is to legally buy the design and follow the terms of use as specified by the design creator.

Finally, if you’re wondering if you can also if you can trademark the position and arrangement of the designs you purchase on a piece of clothing, the short answer is yes. In Star Athletica v. Varsity Brands the Supreme Court ruled that two dimensional designs on the surface of clothing are protectable by copyright. This includes combinations, positioning and arrangements of shapes, colors and lines.

Obviously, this is a very basic overview or copyright law and what it entails. If you would like more information on this issue, this article by Gordon Firemark, a lawyer in Los Angeles who deals extensively with this issue, is a good place to start. As a general rule, however, the easiest way to avoid infringing on a copyright is to legally purchase all the designs you use and to be aware of the terms of use for those designs.

The History of Mardi Gras

According to the site Mardi Gras New Orleans, the origins of Mardi Gras are centered in medieval Europe, passing through Rome and Venice and landing in France. When the French came to the new world to colonize parts of North America, Mardi Gras came along for the ride. It landed in what would one day become the state of Louisiana, and the first named spot in that state was first called “Pointe du Mardi Gras”. This was in 1699.

By 1718, New Orleans was founded and by 1730, Mardi Gras was celebrated openly. At this time, however, they didn’t celebrate by throwing beads, having giant parades and drinking a lot. Instead, the were very French, and celebrated with elegant and elaborate balls, suitable for a Mardi Gras princess. The affairs were the model for the New Orleans Mardi Gras balls that still continue today.

It wasn’t until 1781 that the first reference to a Mardi Gras “carnival” appeared. By the late 1830s, there were processions with flaming torches and maskers with carriages as well as riders on horseback. In 1856, the Mistick Krewe of Comus was formed, the members of this krewe were always anonymous, and the krewe was known for its elaborate and dazzling floats.

If, for you, the fun of Mardi Gras has always been the “throws” of beads and other items, you would have had to wait until 1870 to get in on that action. The King of Mardi Gras, Rex, would appear for the first time in 1872 and that was also the year that the official Mardi Gras Colors of purple, green and gold were introduced, oddly enough, to honor a Russian Grand Duke.

In 2022, Mardi Gras begins on March 1, so you still have some time to outfit your krewe. Whether you’re catching beads, eating a king cake, or simply like purple, gold and green, Lynnie Pinnie has the Mardi Gras designs you need!

Where to Sell Your Work

For some people who do embroidery, one of the prime venues for selling what they make can be craft fairs or trade shows. Such events can be a great option for sales, but they also take a lot of work. There may be a booth or a table to set up. All the stock needs to be transported. Depending on the set-up, you might be on your feet for hours and hours. And then, when the event is over, all the merchandise that didn’t sell has to be repacked, the set-up has to pulled down and loaded up, and it all has to go back to your workspace, to be unpacked, sorted and stored. That can be a lot of work, and it’s not necessarily work that everyone wants to do or can do. If that’s your situation, here are some ideas for places you can sell that might suit you better.

Etsy – Most people who embroider and familiar with Etsy. If, by some chance you aren’t, Etsy is a marketplace that specializes in vintage and handmade items. It’s a place where a lot of designers, artisans and creators sell. For some, it can be a very fertile platform for sales. Just be aware that Etsy does have fees and rules and that it may not suit everyone. Still, it does have the advantage of a dedicated customer base, and a platform that is known and trusted. Just do your research before deciding if this platform is right for you. Make sure you fully understand all the fees and requirements.

Facebook/Instagram Shops – If you are on social media, specifically Facebook or Instagram, having a shop on your profile or page might be a good option for you. This option is designed to take advantage of traffic you already have on your pages and profiles and allow your customers to buy right on Facebook or Instagram. Keep in mind to utilize this option you will have to add all your products to your desired platform which could be a time consuming process. Your business will also need to be eligible to set up a shop.

Create Your Own Site – There are a variety of software packages and sites that can help you create your own online store. Shopify, WooCommerce, and Ecwid to name just a few. The advantage to having your own site is that it’s all under your control. The disadvantage is that it’s all under your control. You have to figure out how to set up payment options. You have to add necessary information and products. You have to figure out where and how to host the site. There is more control over having a site that is yours that you host, but there are also more issues that need to be handled. If you’re not tech savvy or interested in having to deal with the details of setting up a site, this most likely will not be the option for you.

Amazon Handmade – Created as an alternative to Etsy, Amazon Handmade isn’t as well known, but it could be an option for your business. Amazon Handmade is for artisans and has an application process to sell on their platform. They require you have a professional selling account which comes with a fee, and they take 15% of every sale you make. If that doesn’t sound like a great deal, it might not be, except for the fact that selling on this platform does give you access to Amazon’s audience and marketing budget. Read all the fine print, but this might be a good option for some businesses.

Have a Brick and Mortar – Another option for selling product might be to set up a storefront or to work out of your home. The advantage of a storefront is that you might be able to connect and network with other merchants in your town and you will be in a set place to which people can bring the work they want done. A disadvantage is that stores need to be set up and maintained, you will either need to rent or buy space and you need to be there during set hours. Some business owners get around this by working from their homes, but that may entail letting people into your home and sometimes makes work far too easy to access. There are trade offs with either option.

The thing to remember about selling is there’s always a way to do it if you look hard enough. The Internet has made it easier to reach more people than ever before, so it’s just a matter of doing your research, finding the option you think will work best for you and getting started.

Beginner Machine Embroidery Projects

When you’re just starting out in a new decoration discipline, like, for instance, machine embroidery, everything can be intimidating. You worry about wasting a garment or fabric. There may be some uncertainty about what stabilizer to use. Choosing thread and bobbins may be confusing. For some people, the worry about screwing something up (which happens and is, for most, a normal part of the process) keeps them from ever pressing the start button on their machine at all. Getting the first successful project out of the way can be key to a successful career in machine embroidery. The question is, where to start? This blog post has some suggestions for simple projects that most anyone who is a novice embroiderer should be able to complete fairly quickly and easily.

Project # 1: Towels – Towels generally fall into two categories. The first is kitchen towels, which are usually of a lighter weight fabric and generally will have no or very little pile to them. With a linen – like kitchen towel, it will most likely not be necessary to use a topping, a simple stabilizer will do. If you’re interested in doing a cute set of kitchen towels, Lynnie Pinnie has some cute kitchen themed designs and applique options that would be sure to work for your purposes. The other option for a simple towel project would be monogrammed hand towels for a guest bathroom or a housewarming gift. These sorts of towels will have a pile, so you will need to use both a stabilizer and a topping. Hand towels lend themselves nicely to monograms, and you can find some wonderful monogram frames and fonts here on LynniePinnie.com.

Project #2: Burp Cloths – A burp cloth is another easy project and a useful one as well, either as part of a gift set for a new mother at a baby shower, or as something you can embroidery and sell in your online shop. As with towels, burp cloths aren’t generally difficult to hoop and may or may not have a pile, depending on which type you choose to embroider. If you are embroidering a lighter density design, you may be able to use a tearaway stabilizer. Heavier, more dense designs are going to require poly mesh stabilizer or a cutaway. Remember, you want to be sure your stabilizer can handle the stitches in the design because you want to avoid the design puckering when it’s washed. If you think burp cloths might be your niche, Lynnie Pinnie has a variety of baby themed designs that can keep you happily embroidering burp cloths for quite some time.

Project #3: Baby Blankets – Keeping with our theme of easy baby shower gifts, a monogrammed or embroidered baby blanket is a lovely gift for any mother to be or new baby. While blankets might be a slightly more advanced project, they are still fairly simple and easy to embroider. Karlie Belle, one of the lovely instructors at Virtual Applique Getaway this year, has a wonderful step by step tutorial on how to add a name to a baby blanket, that may be helpful for those who have never done this before. And if you’re looking for some adorable applique options to add to a blanket, Lynnie Pinnie has you covered!

Project # 4: A Winter Scarf – Like most of the projects mentioned in this post so far, scarfs are flat, so they’re fairly easy to hoop. They also tend to be made of a substantial fabric, but not too thick, so hooping shouldn’t be too tricky. Scarves also lend themselves nicely to a monogram for a classic look, or to an applique if you’re inclined to get a bit more fancy. If you’re looking for products to sell at craft fairs or online, scarves can be a good bet there as well. As with the other season, winter themed designs are available from Lynnie Pinnie and will be sure to make your scarf project a success.

The main thing to remember when starting out is that mistakes will happen, and that everyone makes them. Don’t let the fear of screwing up a project keep you from learning all that your machine can do. Find tutorials, ask questions in groups (we’re happy to answer questions and help in the Lynnie Pinnie group) and keep practicing with your machine. You’ve invested the money to buy the machine and the time to learn to use it, so don’t let anything hold you back from creating amazing embroidered items!

Stabilizer Basics

As a singing nun in Austria once advised, the best place to start is at the very beginning, so the first thing we’ll discuss is the basic categories of stabilizer. As with most things, the basics can quickly get a little complicated, as each basic category can split into subcategories that contain stabilizers with more specific uses. In order to make this as easy to understand as possible, think of it like building blocks. You learn the basic categories, which are your foundation, and then move on the the more specific options, often called specialty stabilizers or backings, which might have a less broad application or may even be applied only to one specific type of job.

At the most basic level, there are essentially two categories of stabilizer, cutaway and tearaway. As the names imply, tearaway stabilizer can be torn, while cutaway requires removal with scissors. Pretty much every type of stabilizer falls into one of these two categories. The exception to this rule would be water soluble, which requires water to be removed. Water solubles are a popular option for patches or free standing lace and also tend to be toppings. A topping is a stabilizer that is used to keep stitches from sinking into pile fabrics. It is a useful option for those embroidering towels or fleece.

For many embroiderers, tearaway seems like the optimal stabilizer solution, mostly because removal can often happen fairly quickly, since the excess stabilizer can easily be torn away. A quality tearaway, one that is well made, will tear quickly and cleanly. A tearaway stabilizer that is of lesser quality or less well made, won’t tear cleanly and often will leave fuzzy edges that can fray or make the embroidery look untidy. A quality tearaway will also stabilize effectively and hold stitches firmly, but only require a minimum amount of force to tear. A tearaway that requires yanking hard to remove excess stabilizer runs the risk of pulling stitches and distortion of the finished product.

Tearaway stabilizers generally come in three options: light weight (1.5 or 1.8 ounce), medium weight (2.0 or 2.5 ounce) and heavy weight (3.0 ounce). In some cases, the medium and heavy weight options may also be called “hat” or “cap” backing. The name comes from the fact that these weights will most often be used when embroidering a hat. The stabilizers known as cap backings are heavier weight, usually stiffer and more paper-like, which means they can stabilize heavy fabrics and tear sharply and quickly.

Cutaway stabilizers, as the name implies, will require a little more work to remove. All cutaway stabilizers will require cutting away the excess stabilizer as the method of removal. Some embroiderers prefer to cut close to the stitches while others will cut as far away as possible from the stitched design. A common trick is to cut the stabilizer to slightly larger than the design, which lessens the need for cutting after the embroidery is completed.

Cutaway stabilizer is a popular option for use with lighter or stretchy fabrics as it provides the fabric with increased stability. Embroidery on heavy weight fabrics like sweatshirt material, or jackets, can also work well with a cutaway stabilizer. While there are light weight cutaways available, a 2.5 ounce cutaway is considered by some to be the universal stabilizer option. A 3.0 cutaway may be the weight used when embroidering heavier fabrics, but 2.5 ounce cutaway is, for some, the only stabilizer they ever use.

The third category of stabilizer is the water soluble options, which are stabilizer, but aren’t generally designed to remain with the fabric for the long term. As the name implies, a water soluble stabilizer dissolves when water is applied to it. Only the parts that have been actually embroidered remain to do their job. Water soluble stabilizer can be a cutaway/washaway, which looks somewhat like a standard stabilizer but which dissolves in water, or it can look more like plastic. The versions that appear to be more like plastic will either be Vilene or Badgemaster, which are heavier water soluble stabilizers that are often used for badges and sometimes used for free standing lace. The other water soluble option, which has the appearance of a thin plastic, is a water soluble topping, which is used to keep stitches from sinking into towels or fleece. You may often here water soluble toppings referred to as Solvy, but that is an inaccurate description. Solvy is a trademarked name for water soluble toppings from Sulky, but has, over the years, become a more generic term, like Kleenex when used for tissue regardless of actual brand name.

Author’s note: This is the first chapter of a book about stabilizer that is in process currently. We hope to have it available for sale soon.

Words and Sayings

I’m a writer, so I don’t suppose it’s a surprise that one of the first categories of designs I was attracted to was the words and sayings category. I’m a big fan of the marriage of words and images, and Lynnie Pinnie has some really cute and fun designs that are just that. Since the site also has an enormous back catalog of designs (1600 I believe I was told was the number) posts like this also help point out some applique designs, and design categories, that you might otherwise have missed.

The “Naturally Sweet” and “Berry Adorable” designs take cute fruit to a whole new level. Continuing our theme of cute food, and also a possible adorable Valentine’s Day design, we have the “Sweetie Pie” heart applique. If you feel strongly about eating your veggies, you might want to go for the “Corn Maze Cutie” filled embroidery design. Clearly, at Lynnie Pinnie, we like adorable food.

For those who are working with religious themes, Lynnie Pinnie has a variety of word art combinations based on Bible verses and religious themes. If John 3:16 is a favorite verse, Lynnie Pinnie has it available in a word art machine embroidery design file and in a vintage Colorwork Sketch file. Proverbs 3.5 is the Scripture quoted in Tribal Arrows word art applique. You can also find Psalm 139.14 in the same Tribal Arrows word art applique design. Finally, we have the Blessed Nation, Psalm 33:12 in an applique.

While we know that boys can like dolls and girls can play football, there are just some designs that seem to lend themselves more to one gender than another. If you’re looking for “boy” designs, Lynnie Pinnie has some cute ones on offer. The “Touchdown” football applique would be adorable on the shirt you make for your future quarterback or wide receiver. The “Bro” appliques for little brother, middle brother and big brother, would be perfect for a family portrait, or as a way to introduce a new sibling. And if you have recently had a new little boy arrive, the “Thank Heaven for Little Boys” clothesline applique could be the perfect decoration for his onsie.

Photographing Embroidery

If you run an online business, one of the most important pieces of the puzzle when it comes to selling is the photography of your products. Pictures that are out of focus, or fuzzy, or poorly lit, or just badly staged can sabotage sales in a way that can see your bottom line leaking red ink. Bad pictures can kill a good website design. The saying “A picture is worth a thousand words” is a saying for a reason. A good picture can sell your products in a way paragraphs of copy cannot (and I say that as someone who writes for a living and loves words). So, given that we know good product photos are important, the question becomes how do we get the best photos possible? That’s what I want to talk about a little bit today.

The first thing is to make sure you start with the best finished product you can create. That means you’ve trimmed any strings and gotten rid of any loose threads. If you’re photographing embroidery on a garment, make sure the garment is wrinkle and stain free. When planning a design/garment combo that you know you’re making to photograph, you also might want to take into account the interaction of fabric and thread. You want the end result to be one that is harmonious, but also something that showcases the embroidery work you’ve done. So take that into account.

The next thing is to create a photo backdrop. Some people will have a variety of these based on color or pattern, other people just go with something simple like a standard white backdrop. These backdrops can be purchased ready made, or can be created using contact paper or photography paper and large pieces of cardboard. You may want a couple of these backdrops. One to put under the product and one to put behind it.

After you’ve got your backdrop set up, the next task is to light your product. Good lighting is a must for good photography. Luckily, certainly since the days when the pandemic began, there are a wide range of lighting options in a wide range of prices. You can opt for something simple like a ring light, or you can purchase lights designed specifically for photography. A lot depends on your budget, how many photos you think you’ll be taking and the cost of what you’re selling. It goes without saying that you should purchase the best lighting option you can, but it’s not worth investing hundreds of dollars in lighting if your products only sell for twenty dollars or less. Even a basic lighting option is likely to be able to do the job.

After your product is staged and lit, you need to figure out what you’ll use to take the picture. Back in the day, an expensive camera was deemed the best tool for the job and in some cases, an expensive digital camera might be your best option. For a lot of businesses, however, the camera on your mobile phone can capture pictures that will be more than useful. Given how much technology has progressed and the quality of cellphone cameras, it’s entirely possible you won’t need more than your phone to get quality pictures.

Finally, after you’ve figured out your backdrop, lighting and camera options, the last thing is to stage your picture. How you stage things depends somewhat on where you’re selling. If you’re photographing things for your own website, you may just want a straightforward product shot with nothing extra stealing focus from the item you’re selling. Those who sell on Etsy and other platforms of that type may wish to add props in the photo with their product, creating more of a lifestyle picture than a simple photo of one product. Staging your product can create more interesting pictures, but avoid getting so elaborate that you obscure whatever item is for sale.